This title is a part of our CasebookPlus™ offering as ISBN 9781684677870. Learn more at Faculty-CasebookPlus.com.

This casebook is designed with an emphasis on accessibility, includes many discussion problems and questions focusing on real-world application, and gives students a solid grounding in the basic principles of administrative law that they might come across in regulatory practice. While it pays due attention to the historical evolution of the doctrine in certain areas, this casebook focuses more heavily on current standards. Administrative law as a subject matter encompasses some very interesting theoretical discussions. Rather than remain strictly theoretical to the point of bordering on encyclopedic, this book tends toward the more practical, while still including enough reference to theory to enable a professor who wants to introduce more theoretical discussion into the classroom to do so.

The new edition incorporates new developments through the Supreme Court's 2018-19 term, including excerpts from Gundy v. United States (2019) regarding the nondelegation doctrine, Lucia v. SEC (2018) regarding who is an Officer of the United States, Kisor v. Wilkie (2019) regarding Auer deference, and Spokeo v. Robbins (2016) regarding standing doctrine, and much more. The new edition includes sufficient material to support an advanced administrative law course taught to students with previous exposure to the regulatory state. The authors created additional teaching resources to assist in using the book for such a course.

The casebook is supported by an extensive teacher’s manual, and other helpful supplementary materials.


Imprint: Foundation Press
Series: University Casebook Series
Publication Date: 12/30/2019

Kristin E. Hickman, University of Minnesota Law School

Richard J. Pierce Jr., George Washington University Law School

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The new edition incorporates new developments through the Supreme Court's 2018-19 term, including excerpts from Gundy v. United States (2019) regarding the nondelegation doctrine, Lucia v. SEC (2018) regarding who is an Officer of the United States, Kisor v. Wilkie (2019) regarding Auer deference, and Spokeo v. Robbins (2016) regarding standing doctrine, and much more.

Learn more in our author video.